Evening Job Fair at Nestle

Allied is hiring for Nestle!  Come see us on-site at 555 Nestle Way in Breinigsville this Tuesday, June 19th, from 4pm until 7pm to apply for forklift positions.  These are long-term opportunities with great potential for hire.  If you are unable to attend the job fair, you can apply online, or stop by our office at 752 Union Blvd. in Allentown Monday–Friday between 8am and 5pm.

Nestle Job Fair 6-19-18

 

Job Search and technology

Wondering how to navigate the technology related to your job search and hiring? Our Director of Corporate Services, Janell O’Brien shared some insights with The Morning Call.

Technology has changed hiring for both job seekers and recruiters

tech job search

For better or for worse, technology has changed the recruitment and job search process, for both those seeking jobs and those hiring for them. It’s easier than ever for recruiters and hiring managers to find candidates who have specific niche skills or even sway candidates who might be currently employed and not actively job searching. Job seekers can not only create online profiles to attract recruiters and apply for jobs with one click, but they can even reach out directly to employers.

With so many tools available to make the process less resource-intensive, candidates are generally the ones doing the “heavy lifting” in terms of making themselves known to recruiters. With setting up LinkedIn, Nexxt, Jobcase and other online accounts that allow them to actively reach out to employers, job seekers are trying to turn themselves into the “hand-picked” candidate.

Reviews

Years ago, it would have been unheard of to find company reviews and salary information when conducting an online job search. Now, according to “The Modern Job Seeker Report” from recruiter software company iCIMS, 92 percent of Americans turn to employer reviews when considering a new job. Plus, one-third of Americans (including 47 percent of millennials) has declined a job offer due to poor company reviews.

Here in the Lehigh Valley, however, the trend of “seeing behind the walls of a company before you ever set foot in the door” isn’t always the norm for job candidates.

“That hasn’t been our experience,” says Janell O’Brien, director of corporate services at Allied Personnel Services in Allentown. “Here in the Lehigh Valley, we find word of mouth, personal connections, news updates and a company’s awards or recognition carry more weight with job seekers than online reviews. Reviews for employers (or any kind of business for that matter) allows for both accurate positive and negative reviews but also allows a space for anyone at all to say anything they like about a business. Savvy customers and consumers should do a full range of research before relying on any one site for review information, as one person’s experience with an employer may not mirror the experience of another.  Work is actually a very personal thing; as we all know, the job you love may be despised by the next person, and the job you can’t do because of a lack of skill may be easily mastered by someone else.”

LinkedIn and online job networks

LinkedIn has held the title of “the” go-to professional social network for 16 years now, and has shown no signs of its popularity or usefulness waning. The site has played a major role in how candidates search for jobs and how recruiters find candidates. With a strong profile and the right connections, you can attract hiring managers and recruiters to the point that you’re literally bringing job opportunities right to your inbox. And with the networking and connections aspect, you can keep a close eye on potential job openings from past colleagues and other connections.

There are other sites that have followed a similar model, such as Nexxt (formerly Beyond.com) and Jobcase, both of which give job seekers the opportunity to create a comprehensive profile to show off their most relevant information for recruiters. These sites allow you to list work preferences such as your willingness to relocate, preferred job location, salary range, personal traits, volunteer work and other career-appropriate information.

While LinkedIn allows some of these more nuanced information categories, the advantage of the other sites is that they power more than 100 existing job-listing websites, meaning users have access to a wide range of employers and opportunities associated with these sites.

Mobile

Today, the norm is searching for a job while using a mobile device. There are countless job board apps and job search apps designed to quickly connect recruiters and hiring managers with job seekers.

While mobile might make the process quicker, how does one stand out amongst all of the technological noise?

“A simple application process that can be done quickly and from anywhere on a mobile device still requires consideration and thought.  To stand out, be the person who follows all of the instructions, who completes the application process accurately without spelling errors and typos, who follows up, or who finds a way to connect with a hiring manager directly,” says O’Brien. “If there is an option to apply directly to an email address, we always recommend doing that over submitting something through a site.  This puts the job seeker in front of a person and shows a sincere interest in a particular position.   We have repeatedly seen job seekers sabotage themselves by applying online over and over and over again to the same company for a wide range of jobs.   This can be construed as desperation and a need for any job at all which is why careful consideration should be given to each application submitted.”

Source: The Morning Call

Ready to tackle the online job search?  Start here!

Jobs at B Braun in Allentown

Allied has the best jobs in the Lehigh Valley!

Join Allied for a job fair conveniently scheduled from 4pm-7pm on Thursday 5/10 at B Braun, 901 Marcon Blvd. in Allentown. We are looking for people with previous experience in a production environment for 2nd and 3rd shift manufacturing positions.

Job Fair at B Braun's Allentown locationB. Braun Medical Inc. leads in thoughtful solutions that address real issues in patient care and clinician safety.  Awarded a 2016 Top Workplaces honor by The Morning Call newspaper, their ethical and purposeful work culture welcomes innovation and rewards progress.

Can’t make the job fair?  Stop by one of our offices Monday–Friday, 8a-5p, to apply, or apply online anytime.

What To Do After An Interview

Interviews can be stressful.  Allied has some easy guides to help you through any interview process.  Start by checking our guide on how to dress for an interview, and review some quick tips for a successful interview.  (Just make sure you don’t prepare too much!)  Finally, follow these steps for ending the interview and proper follow-up.

After the Interview

  • Before leaving, ask the interviewer what the next step is. This will allow you to determine the best way to follow up.
  • If you are asked to call the interviewer about the next step on Wednesday, call on Wednesday. Not Thursday…Wednesday. This is often a test. An employer is evaluating your ability to follow directions and follow-up properly. These skills are vital to any position.
  • If the interviewer said she would call you Friday and you haven’t heard from her, call on Monday. If you must leave a message, be polite and brief.
  • If after leaving a message you haven’t heard anything in 2 more days, send an email. Again, be polite and brief.
  • If you haven’t heard 2 days after that, assume you were not selected and move on. Do not give in to the temptation to call and/or email again to tell the employer they missed out. This will eliminate you from any future consideration should other opportunities within the company arise.

The Thank You Note

You should send a separate thank you note to each interviewer. The note should be handwritten on a conservative card and be brief and professional.

Dear Mr. Gehrig,

I enjoyed meeting with you today regarding the administrative opening with your company. I believe that my experience and your needs will be a good match. I look forward to hearing from you about the next step in the process. Thanks again!

Marilyn

If plans were made for a second step within the next 1 – 2 business days, it would be appropriate to send an email rather than a note card.

Having trouble landing that interview?  Let Allied help!  Apply today and let us connect you to the Lehigh Valley’s top companies!

Job Fair at B Braun Medical, Allentown

Braun Job Fair 2-13-18

Come and learn about these great long-term job opportunities for experienced forklift operators. Can’t make it to the job fair? Stop by our office at 752 Union Boulevard in Allentown, call us at 610.821.0220, or apply online. Don’t miss this chance to get your foot in the door at one of the Lehigh Valley’s top companies!

Spreading Holiday Cheer in the Lehigh Valley

One of our favorite things to do during the holidays is giving back to the Lehigh Valley community. It brings us such joy to help those in need of a little extra holiday cheer. This year Allied partnered with Valley Youth House to collect gifts for 12 children and teenagers. We are thrilled to see our lobby filled with presents – one of our largest collections to date!

“For it is in giving that we receive.” – St Francis of Assisi

Xmas donations 2017

Allied Named Best Employment Agency

Allied Personnel Services has again been named Best Employment Agency in the 2017 Morning Call Reader’s Choice awards.

MC_2017ReadersChoiceLO

This is the 11th Reader’s Choice win for Allied.  Thank you to all of our employees and customers!

Looking for employment?  Check out our available positions and apply today.

Looking for employees?  Contact us to learn about our staffing solutions.

Driving Safely in Autumn Weather Conditions

The quickly changing environment and weather during the autumn season present a variety of challenges for drivers. Sharp declines in temperature can result in mixed precipitation, black ice, and snow. An abundance of falling leaves makes driving surfaces slippery. Extreme sun glare in the mornings and evenings makes it difficult to see clearly. To drive defensively during this season of transition, it is important that your vehicle is adequately prepared for driving conditions; that you are aware of the weather and animal hazards related to the season; and that you understand the correlation between reaction time and braking distance when unexpected hazards present themselves.
 
Prepare Your Vehicle
Being prepared prior to getting out on the road is the first step to safe driving. Prior to operating the vehicle, conduct a pre-trip walk-around inspection; checking tire pressure, fluid levels, headlights, brake lights and signal lights to ensure that they are inflated to proper levels, and in good, working condition. Also, make sure that your vehicle is equipped with functioning wiper blades and that the wiper arms are exerting enough pressure on the blades to ensure a clean sweep of the windshield. If wiper blades are worn or damaged, replace them immediately.
In addition to the walk-around survey, be sure to make adjustments to mirrors, seats and/or the radio before you begin driving and never while driving. Adjusting controls while driving distracts you from paying attention to events that are occurring on the road. And no matter what the season, always wear your seatbelt when operating or riding in a motor vehicle. This also applies to passengers riding in the back seat(s) of the vehicle.
The Hazards
 
Wet Roads
When wet weather conditions are present, always slow down and leave enough room around your vehicle to create a cushion of safety. Remember that stopping on a wet road can take up to four times the normal distance as on a dry road. When road surfaces are wet, watch for the presence of standing water in the roadway. When water stands or puddles on the pavement, it lifts oils and other fluids from the road causing slick spots, which increase the chance for your vehicle to skid.
Excessive water can also cause your vehicle to hydroplane, which means that your tires “surf” on a film of water like a skier. Sudden, heavy downpours, driving too fast or driving on worn tires also increases your chances of hydroplaning. If the vehicle begins to hydroplane, do not brake or turn suddenly. These actions could put the car into a skid. Instead, ease your foot off the gas until the car slows down and you feel the wheels connect with the surface of the road. If you must apply the brakes in this situation, light, gentle pumping actions will be effective. If the vehicle has anti-lock brakes, brake normally and hold your foot firmly on the brake pedal so that the vehicle’s computer mimics a pumping action.
Mixed Precipitation and Ice
On cold, wet days, look for ice in shady spots along the roadway. Because ice forms easily in these conditions, these areas are often the first to freeze and the last to dry out. Slow down and watch for ice on bridges and overpasses. These apparatuses often have icy spots even when the rest of the roadway is relatively dry. Because bridges and overpasses are suspended above ground-level, they are not insulated from the heat generated by the ground and are subject to direct contact with cold temperatures and wind.
In temperature conditions of around 32 degrees Fahrenheit, ice can often become wet, which then causes it to be more slippery than at colder temperatures. Be aware of the danger posed by “black ice,” which is a thin coat of glazed ice present on top of the road’s surface. Black ice is nearly transparent—making it a hazard that drivers cannot see. Always reduce your speed when temperatures are cold and the risk of icy conditions is present.
Wet Leaves
An abundance of wet leaves on the roadway can be just as dangerous as ice. Slow down and use caution when leaves are present on the roadway. Leaf accumulations are often found near sidewalks and stormwater drains.
Sun Glare
During the autumn season, the sun rises and sets closer to the horizon and almost exactly to the east and west. Because of this, driving can become more difficult and dangerous when heading in either direction. Intense sun glare can blind drivers, causing traffic to suddenly slow down or stop. To drive safely in conditions of extreme sun glare, take the following actions:
·         Wear a pair of good sunglasses and pay attention to traffic and the presence of bicyclists or pedestrians;
·         Reduce speed and drive slower than normal, covering the brake if necessary;
·         Keep the vehicle’s windshield clean. Oftentimes the glare from the sun makes any dirt present on the windshield more obvious; and
·         Be aware that drivers may slow down suddenly or stop.
 
Fog
Another driving hazard to be aware of is fog. Fog dramatically decreases visibility and can leave roadway surfaces wet and slick.   In foggy conditions, slow down, increase your following distance and leave a cushion of safety around your vehicle. Most fog-related traffic fatalities occur because the driver is unable to perceive hazards present in front of the vehicle and when these hazards suddenly appear, they aren’t able to react in time. Slowing down the vehicle allows you additional time to safely react to unexpected conditions.
Using your headlights correctly is another important technique for driving safely in fog. Always turn on headlights and use the low-beam setting. When conditions are foggy, the high beam headlights are not effective because they direct light up into the fog making it more difficult to see ahead of you.   Using the low beam setting directs light down onto the road, making your vehicle more visible to other drivers. Remember that in foggy conditions, other drivers also have limited visibility.   To increase your visibility to other drivers, use your turn signals early and brake with plenty of notice. In addition, keep your windows clear by using the windshield wipers and turning on the defroster. If you leave the roadway due to foggy conditions, pull off completely, turn off the headlights, and turn on the hazard lights so that other motorists can see your vehicle.
 
Deer Collisions
Recent statistics show that most of the people who are injured or killed in deer-related collisions were not wearing their seatbelts. No matter what the season, always wear your seatbelt.
The peak season for deer movement is during the months of October through December. This is called the “rut” or deer mating season. One of the greatest hazards of the deer mating season is that deer become less cautious about darting into and across roads.
Keep in mind that collisions with deer can happen at any time, in any place, regardless of the type of road or environment. Collisions have occurred on busy city highways as well as on rural roads near wooded or agricultural areas. When driving during the months of heightened deer movement, keep the following safety tips in mind:
·         When traveling at night, if there is no oncoming traffic, use your high-beam headlights to increase your night vision.
·         Be particularly attentive for deer between sunset and midnight, and during the hours shortly before and after sunrise. These times are typically when deer are the most active.
·         Drive carefully in areas known to have high deer populations and be extra cautious in areas where roads divide agricultural fields from forestland. Look for road signs that mark deer crossing zones and avoid using your cell phone or other devices when traveling in these zones.
·         Scan the road ahead of you to give yourself additional time to react to unsafe conditions. If you see a deer, slow down and be prepared to stop. Also, keep in mind that when you see one deer, there are probably others nearby. Deer often travel in small groups forming a single-file line.
·         If a deer enters the road or the lane you are traveling in, brake firmly and stay in your lane. Though your immediate reaction may be to swerve out of the way, some of the most serious crashes occur when drivers swerve out of their lane. Swerving to avoid striking a deer increases the risk of hitting another vehicle or losing control of your vehicle.
·         Another technique to use when encountering a deer on the roadway is to flash your headlights from bright to dim or honk your horn to encourage the deer to move on.
·         If your vehicle strikes a deer or if a deer is blocking the road, don’t get out of your vehicle and touch the animal—it may still be alive and could possibly injure you. Call the police for assistance.
·         Finally, when driving in zones heavily populated with deer, don’t rely on devices such as deer whistles, deer fences or reflectors to deter them. Relying on these items often gives drivers a false sense of security, which results in them letting down their guard and not paying close attention to their surroundings.
 
Reaction Time and Braking Distance
 
As a defensive driver, an important concept to understand is the correlation between reaction time and braking distance. The physics that contribute to a driver reacting to a situation, applying the brakes and bringing the vehicle to a complete stop play a significant role in preventing collisions.
Reaction time is the time it takes you to recognize the need to stop or maneuver the vehicle. The average person’s reaction time is approximately 3/4 of a second if they are paying attention.
 
Braking distance includes a variety of factors such as the condition of the road surface; dry, wet or icy, plus the condition of the vehicle’s brakes and tires; proper inflation and good treads and how many passengers or additional weight the vehicle is transporting. The formula for how fast a vehicle will stop equals reaction time + braking distance.
For example, at 60 mph a vehicle travels 88 feet per second. It takes 3/4 of a second to perceive the danger and another 3/4 to react and apply the brakes. In these 1.5 seconds, you have traveled 132 feet and the vehicle is still going 60 mph. Once you apply the brakes there is a .27 second lag before the brakes actually engage for a total of 1.77 seconds before the brakes are engaged. This equals a distance of 155 feet in which the vehicle has traveled during the perception and reaction phase of the stopping process.
 
Conclusion
 
The autumn months are a beautiful time of transition and change. Before getting out on the road, be sure that your vehicle is prepared to meet the various weather conditions and exposures associated with this season. Along with being a defensive driver, practice being a thoughtful driver by adjusting your driving habits in accordance with the road and weather conditions and eliminating the temptation to focus on distractions, both inside and outside of the vehicle. Keep your eyes on the road, leave your cell phone in your bag and no matter what the season, always wear your seatbelt.